My Disney Easter Basket

Easter in my house growing up always meant colored eggs and baskets full of plastic grass topped with candy and sweets. And, as we know, Disney’s big on the whole candy and sweets thing, so I wanted to share with you some of my favorite Disney sweets. These would definitely be in my personal Easter basket:

The Disney Food Blog Easter Basket

The Disney Food Blog Easter Basket

So, why these particular goodies? Let’s take a look at my Easter basket contents — and a few items that just didn’t fit! — and hopefully you’ll find a few new treats to try!

Rowntree’s Fruit Pastilles
Easily my all-time favorite candy, Rowntree’s Fruit Pastilles can be found in Epcot’s UK pavilion. For those of you who haven’t tried them, think: fruity jujubes coated with sugar. Then make them about 100 times better than fruity jujubes coated with sugar, and you have Rowntree’s Fruit Pastilles.

When these come in rolls, the candy is circular, but [Read more…]

Miyuki: Epcot’s Japanese Candy Artist

This is the season for trick-or-treating, which means candy! And when I think of candy in Disney World, I think of Miyuki Sugimori.

Miyuki the Candy Lady

Miyuki the Candy Lady

About Miyuki and the Japanese Art of Candy Sculpture
Disney only works with the highest-quality artists and entertainers, and that standard remains in tact with this incredible candy artist from from Tokyo. Miyuki learned the craft of candy sculpture from her grandfather — a renowned Japanese candy artist — and is the first and only woman to receive training in Amezaiku in Japan. To date, she is one of only 15 people officially trained in the art.

To see Miyuki perform, simply head over to the Japan pavilion in Epcot’s World Showcase to catch one of her shows. Her “stage,” equipped with heating elements to keep the candy pliable and with fans to cool down finished pieces, is located just outside the front entrance of Mitsukoshi department store.

Miyuki's Stage

Miyuki's Stage

Her candy sculptures begin as a ball of hot, malleable rice starch candy — this looks a lot like pulled taffy. Miyuki takes requests from the audience to determine what her sculptures will look like, adds food coloring to the candy ball, and begins stretching, sculpting, and painting the candy to create delicate, detailed works of art. Miyuki then hangs the piece in front of a fan to cool down the hot candy and set the design.

Miyuki mixes edible food coloring into the rice candy

Miyuki mixes edible food coloring into the rice candy

What animal will it be...

What animal will it be...

An Alligator Emerges

An Alligator Emerges

Or A Seahorse Makes its Debut

Or A Seahorse Makes its Debut

Is That A Pink Leopard?

Is That A Pink Leopard?

Most of Miyuki’s sculptures for Epcot visitors are of animals — frogs, swans, snakes, alligators, tigers, elephants, etc. She seems to specialize (or maybe the guests do!) in fantastical creatures — dragons and unicorns are her most requested items. By the way, general protocol is that the person who makes the request for a certain sculpture gets to take that sculpture home as a free souvenir, so be sure to arrive early for Miyuki’s shows so you can be in the front of the “line.”

Miyuki has a wonderful “melodic” way of working that’s hard to portray in pictures, so I wanted to add a couple of videos to this post so that you can get a better idea of what it’s really like to watch her.

Where and When To Find Miyuki at Epcot
You can see Miyuki’s show Sunday-Thursday at 12:55, 2:15, 4:00, 5:05, 6:05 & 6:55pm. To double check times before you go to Disney World, check Steve Soares’ Walt Disney World Entertainment Site. Once you’re in Disney World, grab an Epcot Times Guide for the most up-to-date show times.

Miyuki Sign

To celebrate Miyuki on the web, visit her YouTube page or join the (unofficial, but still fun!) Miyuki Facebook Group.

Have you or your kids received a candy sculpture from Miyuki? Share your stories by leaving a comment below!